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by • March 30, 2015 • Building Science, HVAC & Dehumidification, Insulation & Air SealingComments (5)7128

Tips for a Net Zero House

If you’ve followed my work for very long, you’ll realize that I basically stopped talking about “Green Building” about 3-4 years ago.  The term “Green” has been too watered down to mean anything anymore.  Instead, I talk about “High Performance Houses”, or “Comfort”.  I find that my clients have had un-comfortable houses in the past and that talking about comfort really resonates.  I also have lots of clients who want low energy bills.  The lure of a Zero dollar electric bill is pretty awesome.

In this blog post, I thought I’d give you the extended version of this house’s story from the video.  This is a house my company built for Forge Craft Architecture‘s founder Scott Ginder and his family.  It’s a house that will generate enough electricity with it’s Solar Array to have a Zero sum electric bill for the course of the entire year.  (some months the bill will be negative, some months they will have to pay, but overall if you sum the 12 months of the year it will be $0)

The house we built with Forge Craft Architecture is stunningly handsome, but also VERY high performance.  I'm proud of this #BUILD.

The house we built with Forge Craft Architecture is stunningly handsome, but also VERY high performance. I’m proud of this #BUILD.

  #1  Design:

This is where it all starts.  The Architect on this project did everything right from a design perspective.  He didn’t make the house too big (it’s right at 2000 sq feet of conditioned space).  Remember the advice of famous Architect Sarah Susanka author of the “Not So Big House” series.  (if you are designing a house I highly recommend this series of books)

“Every room — indeed, every square foot . . . has been designed as everyday living space, … and the money saved by reducing the volume of space has been invested instead in tailoring to fit its owners to a T: on beautiful design and craftsmanship, on healthy and resource-efficient materials, and on better building practices.” -Sarah Susanka 

This Forge Craft Architecture house is well designed with rich spaces yet it's only 2000 sq feet.  Note the built-in dining nook off the kitchen.

This Forge Craft Architecture house is well designed with rich spaces yet it’s only 2000 sq feet. Note the built-in dining nook off the kitchen.

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Scott did a fantastic job of making the most of every square foot, but he also made the most of every window without going overboard.  Remember that even the most expensive Double Pane window is about R-3, and if you compare that with a well insulated wall at R-20+ you’ll quickly see how glass houses can be hard to heat or cool.

#2 Air Sealing

  I’ve come to be a huge believer in “Building Tight” over the last 10 years.  This is one of the few things that a builder can do with very specific measured results at the end.  If you build a tightly air sealed house you won’t waste energy by leaking in hot/humid (or pollen filled) air.  The blower door test doesn’t lie.  Shoot for a blower door score of 3ACH50 or less if you’re planning for a Net Zero house (or any new build or remodel for that matter).  If you really want to build a fantastic house shoot for 1ACH50 or less!  This house blew a blower door score of 1.9ACH50. Tight!

Owens Corning's Energy Complete system includes a pink goo that's a cross between spray foam and latex caulk.  It is a good way to get a lower blower door score.

Owens Corning’s Energy Complete system includes a pink goo that’s a cross between spray foam and latex caulk. It is a good way to get a lower blower door score.

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We used Tremco Dymonic caulk at the slab to bottom plate connections for additional air sealing.

We used Tremco Dymonic caulk at the slab to bottom plate connections for additional air sealing.

#3 INsulation + OUTsulation

We used 2×6 exterior walls with Advanced Framing on this project.  We insulated the headers with a layer of 3/4″ rigid foam, and we added a layer of 3/4″ foam on all the exterior walls.  We added a 2″ layer of PolyIso insulation on top of the roof deck, then sprayed Open Cell foam 7″ thick at the roof, and 5.5″ thick at the garage ceiling (for the bedroom floors above), and at the walls adjacent to the garage for extra air sealing.  We used Owens Corning Energy Complete blown-in fiberglass & air sealing program on the exterior walls.  I shot a great video on Advanced vs Traditional Framing at this house if you’d like to see more.

Open Cell foam at the roof deck, and Blown Fiberglass at the exterior walls.  Batts were used on interior walls for sound control.

Open Cell foam at the roof deck, and Blown Fiberglass at the exterior walls. Batts were used on interior walls for sound control.

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California (3 stud) corners are a great advanced framing method to ensure corners are insulated all the way back!

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Look for my advanced framing video for more on making these insulated headers.

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24″ OC 2×6 studs lined up nicely with the load path of the trusses above.

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We used Tyvek DrainWrap on the walls, then covered them with 3/4″ R-mate foam that has a silver facing for additional radiant barrier. Notice the horizontal rainscreen for the vertical wood siding on the front of the house.

We also insulated the outside of this slab with termite resistant Bora-Foam from Nissus Corp.  This made an R-11 continuous exterior insulated slab.

We glued it to the slab then later shot Hilti cap nails through it.  Eventually it got a Sto synthetic stucco finish in grey to look like a standard slab.

We glued it to the slab then later shot Hilti cap nails through it. Eventually it got a Sto synthetic stucco finish in grey to look like a standard slab.

Wrapping the Slab Foundation with Bora-Foam.  EPS with Borate impregnated to resist termites.

Wrapping the Slab Foundation with Bora-Foam. EPS with Borate impregnated to resist termites.

The guys from Termi-Mesh did a great job installing our foam.

The guys from Termi-Mesh did a great job installing our foam.

Took a few steps to ensure termites were stopped if they tunneled behind the foam.

Took a few steps to ensure termites were stopped if they tunneled behind the foam.

This house is well insulated and we did a good job of making up for what little thermal bridging we had with our advanced framing.

#4 Top Notch Mechanical Systems:

I mentioned it in the video but I can’t stress this enough.  You should work with a mechanical designer to match your system to your houses’s loads.  Way too many houses have over-sized HVAC systems because the contractor didn’t spend the time or money to do a detailed design.  I actually pay a third party design firm (Positive Energy here in Austin, TX) do do a Manual J load calculation, then a Manual D duct design, and I have the do equipment specifications so I can had a big package to my HVAC sub-contractor to give me a bid.  Most HVAC subs get these load calculations done from their supply house and they really are focused on output and not quality.

You’ll also notice in the video that we used Mitsubishi’s VRF technology for our Heat Pump HVAC system.  If you are considering Net Zero I would highly recommend Mitsubishi or at least another manufacturer with VRF in their lineup.  This technology has been used in Europe/Asia for the last 30 years by Mitsubishi, Daikin, and LG but it’s very new to the American HVAC manufacturers.  See my other videos on YouTube for greater depth about VRF and why it’s so fantastic.

Lastly, we used a Heat Pump water heater in this house for the domestic hot water.  A Heat Pump water heater takes the heat from the surrounding air and funnels that into the tank to make hot water.  The resulting discharge is chilled and dehumidified air!  In our hot/humid Texas climate it makes perfect sense to put this unit indoors so the Architect designed a great mechanical closet in the foyer to double as a coat closet.  We ducted the output of the Heat Pump water heater to the kitchen to provide a bit of extra cooling.  (turns out we didn’t want that in the winter so we are going back to make a damper to direct that cold air to the foyer in the winter time)  This mechanical closet with a small return was a terrific place to put the Panasonic ERV in the ceiling.  This little wonder is a bargain for fresh air on a tight house (and budget).  We also have a plug in dehumidifier in the mech closet for use in the shoulder seasons to knock down the humidity in the house.  I put a Dehumidifier in all my houses for comfort and this is the least cost option, but still provides fantastic comfort control.

I like how this AirTap brand water heater can be ducted in and out so it can be located in a small closet if needed.

I like how this AirTap brand water heater can be ducted in and out so it can be located in a small closet if needed.

Panasonic's fantastic ERV lives in the mech close too.  In the ceiling above the HP Water Heater.  Link here: http://amzn.to/1Byw2T7

Panasonic’s fantastic ERV lives in the mech close too. In the ceiling above the HP Water Heater.

In conclusion, I love how the Solar Array on this house was done AFTER the construction.  It showed me that the Architect/Client really understood that the goals for the house were more than Net Zero.  It’s fantastic to have a $0 electric bill, but it’s a total failure of a build if the house isn’t comfortable or it’s not durable.

The 7.2 Kw array was kickin' when we filmed this video.

The 7.2 Kw array was kickin’ when we filmed this video.

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Thanks for taking the time to read this post.  Let me know if you have any questions or comments.  I love talking about this geeky stuff, and I wish you the best in your Net Zero #BUILD!

Best,

Matt Risinger

Risinger Homes in Austin, TX

Visit my Blog at www.MattRisinger.com

Risinger Homes is a custom builder and whole house remodeling contractor that specializes in Architect driven and fine craftsmanship work. We utilize an in-house carpentry staff and the latest building science research to build dramatically more efficient, healthy and durable homes.

Be sure to check out my video blog on YouTube

follow me on Twitter @MattRisinger (I’m most active on Twitter)

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  • Cody Sturgill

    Matt, Really enjoy your work, both in building and presenting to us rookies online (i’m nurse by trade but wannabe builder). I live in Northeast KY unfortunately our area is still stuck in 1980 building principles and ideas. Which is unfortunate b/c our climate can be brutal in all seasons. Finding a builder/architect that understands net zero building, completely airtight envelopes, advanced framing techniques, etc.. is impossible here, most just look at you like your stupid if you ask them if they know what a rainscreen is. I follow your blog closely trying to soak up as much as possible in prep to build my own house. My question is this : What advice could you give me in trying to coordinate the building of a efficient durable smart build project of my own? And have you ever written or sold an all inclusive guide to building everything from slab and crawlspace to mechanicals to interior details, even brands and specifics on flashing, rigid, etc.., Something that a good builder with no background science knowledge could follow as kind of a blueprint to start the change in practice in areas like mine all across the country. It would be lifesaver and invaluable. Thanks #build

    • Cody, Too kind my friend, appreciate the compliments! I’ve thought about doing that but haven’t taken the major time investment to put that together. I a way, my blog is attempting to do this in a piece-by-piece basis. I might recommend attending (and bringing your Builder/Architect) to an EEBA Houses That Works one day session. There is one in San Antonion next month. Check their website to see if any are in your area. eeba.org
      Also, buy Joe Lstiburek’s “Builders Guide” for your climate zone. Maybe one day I’ll get around to the extensive guide to building a house… sounds fun.
      If you need some help you can also hire me to consult hourly. I’m frankly expensive, but if you only need a few hours it can be worthwhile.
      I wish you the best, Matt

      • Cody Sturgill

        Thank you for the response. I will definitely check the eeba and grab that book, I appreciate the honesty when you said you were expensive “that thought about how expensive you would be to hire has crossed my mind more than once” but rightfully so you are top notch in my mind and deserve that. I didn’t know you would consult a few hours work, I will definitely do that once I can wrangle a builder here willing to change and learn new practices and lead a new generation of building in our area. Thanks Again.

        Off topic , what screws or product do you use to fasten a 1×3 1×4 rain screen board over top of your rigid foam to reach all the way thru into the sheathing of the house?

    • Jason L Napier

      Good Day Cody, Kentucky does have builders that can do advanced frame, super insulated, and passive construction. They usually don’t advertise but if you ask your local building inspector they will know them. Your local electric utility may also be of assistance. If they know a solar installer they will most likely know a builder. I will be finishing my own Super Insulated Home in Madison Co. Kentucky this year. No shortage in this area, Berea KY has a Solar Home Tour annually.

    • timber guy

      Cody: Take a look at Phillip Rye. His father Doug was one of the early advocates of low energy use and Phillip takes it a step further with design, etc. We’ve used them in Illinois and E. TN, and they have proven their value. They are in Arkansas.
      http://www.rye-homes.com
      http://www.philliprye.com