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by • November 21, 2012 • UncategorizedComments (6)1379

My First Published Article – Journal Of Light Construction “Air Sealing for Hot Climates”

I was super excited to get the mail yesterday, my article I wrote for the Journal of Light Construction finally arrived!  Here’s Sam Ramirez from my crew on the front cover.

How cool to see my company logo on the front cover of a magazine I’ve been reading for the last 15 years.  They did photoshop his Black shirt to Green but what can you do.  Here’s a link to the article if you get chance to read it I’d love some feedback on what you think.  
Happy Thanksgiving Everyone.  – Matt Risinger Risinger Homes in Austin, TX 

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  • Great article Matt. Am I reading correctly that you are now putting the Tyvek over the rigid foam? I know from previous articles and videos that you have been installing the Tyvek first and then putting the rigid foam over the wrap. Why the change?

    Thanks, Michael Carpenter

    • Michael, good catch. The article is wrong! Tyvek first THEN foam outside. Dang. My first article and I messed it up!!! Best, Mat

  • Great article and exposure for your company. I would be curious to learn more about construction details of your roof assembly as well as how you are foaming/sealing eaves. By chance, have you made a video of these details? Thanks!

    • Lance, Thanks for the comments. I’ve done a few videos on the roof details. Goto my channel http://www.youtube.com/mattrisinger and search for my white metal roof video. That’s probably the best one for the details on rooftop foam. My latest spray foam video I posted this week shows open cell foam being used to seal the eaves. Best, Matt Risinger

  • First, I love your blog site. I’m just a regular guy who plans to build a home soon, but I plan to show my architect and builder your site in the future. Also, great journal article. Inside you say:

    “[W]e foam the entire roof deck and eaves from the inside to bring the whole attic inside the home’s thermal envelope. To minimize heat buildup in the resulting “hot roof,” we cover the outside of the deck with 2 inches of polyiso board, a continuous layer of Ice & Water Shield, and a vented standing-seam metal roof on diagonal furring strips.”

    We will soon be designing a home in Central Alabama. (A hot/humid climate.) I have a few questions:

    1. Can you expand on the “hot roof” issue?
    2. Do you always recommend metal roofing when you build a home with a “conditioned” attic?
    3. What is your experience with sealed/conditioned attics and shingled roofing?

    Our neighborhood architectural review committee (and my wife) both prefer shingles over metal roofing. I’d love to hear your thoughts or see a blog posting discussing the effect of a conditioned attic on your choice of roofing materials. (And if the longevity of a shingled roof would be adversely impacted by the conditioned attic.)

  • Chris, Thanks for following my blog! See my answers to your questions in BOLD below:

    1. Can you expand on the “hot roof” issue? THIS MEANS THAT IT’S AN UNVENTED ROOF ASSEMBLY. THIS METHOD HAS BEEN USED FOR DECADES IN OUR HOT CLIMATE AND WORKS QUITE WELL. BUT, IT HAS LESS DRYING POTENTIAL SO WE NEED TO TAKE MORE CAUTION TO ENSURE WATER ISN’T GETTING THROUGH OUR ROOF ASSEMBLY TO WET THE FRAMING/PLYWOOD.
    2. Do you always recommend metal roofing when you build a home with a “conditioned” attic? YES, I LOVE METAL ROOFS FOR MANY REASONS IN OUR CLIMATE ZONE. OTHER ROOF TYPES CAN BE USED BUT BE SURE TO USE A GRACE WATER & ICE SHIELD FULL ADHERED UNDERLAYMENT UNDER THE ENTIRE ROOF. THIS SELF SEALS AROUND NAIL HOLES AND HAS ZERO PERMEABLILITY. SEE MY VIDEO ON YOUTUBE ABOUT A “WHITE METAL ROOF” TO SEE HOW I’M INSTALLING THIS SYSTEM.
    3. What is your experience with sealed/conditioned attics and shingled roofing? THEY WORK VERY WELL TOGETHER, YOU JUST NEED TO DO A GRACE WIP HT UNDERLAYMENT AS I MENTIONED ABOVE. THIS WILL ENSURE THAT ANY WATER THAT MAKES IT PAST YOUR SHINGLES WON’T WET THE ROOF PLYWOOD BELOW. THIS IS ESPECIALLY IMPORTANT BECAUSE OF REDUCED DRYING POTENTIAL WITH A CONDITIONED ATTIC.

    Our neighborhood architectural review committee (and my wife) both prefer shingles over metal roofing. I’d love to hear your thoughts or see a blog posting discussing the effect of a conditioned attic on your choice of roofing materials. (And if the longevity of a shingled roof would be adversely impacted by the conditioned attic.) THE LONGEVITY ISSUES ARE A NON-EXISTENT MYTH WITH SHINGLES. I SAW A GREAT STUDY ON SHINGLE DURABLITY OVER HOT ROOFS (UNVENTED) AND THE SHINGLES DO GET A FEW DEGREES HOTTER BUT THE STUDY SAW NO REDUCED SERVICE LIFE. I BELIEVE THE FLORIDA SOLAR (INSTITUTE?) DID THE STUDY, PROBABLY CAN GOOGLE IT.
    METAL IS A BETTER CHOICE OVERALL FOR DURABLITY, ENERGY EFFICIENCY, AND RECYCLABLITY. BUT SHINGLES ARE BETTER THAN NOT DOING A CONDITIONED ATTIC. PRIORITY IS THE CONDITIONED ATTIC FIRST, METAL ROOF DISTANT SECOND.