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by • June 28, 2013 • UncategorizedComments (5)4802

Fall 2013 AIA Austin Homes Tour – 1930’s Renovation Before/After Photos

1930’s House that was generally in good shape (and not re-muddled)

I recently learned that the house we remodeled with local Architect Hugh Jefferson Randolph was selected to be on the Fall 2013 AIA Austin Homes tour.  This is one of the best homes tours in the Nation and I’m excited to have my 9th house on this tour!  If you are in Austin, TX the weekend of Nov 2-3, 2013 I’d love to have you visit me at this house.

Old photo from the 1980’s of a bedroom in this house.  Notice the staining on the wallpaper from window leaks.

Most of the house had 1/2″ drywall over the original ship-lap 1×8 pine walls that were originally wallpapered.

Beautiful original 2.25″ White Oak Floors.  Notice they laid the floors then built the walls on top.  We saved the floors to re-install later.  

Adding a second story by adding 2′ to the ridge height. 

Great collaboration on the job site with Architect Hugh Jefferson Randolph, our clients the Battles, and Eric Rauser.  Notice the Long Leaf Pine siding that was saved to be stripped and re-installed. 

The lead based paint on the doors was stripped and we re-installed them along with the original hardware.

Tons of opportunities presented themselves once we completed demo.  Originally the FP chimney was enclosed but when we saw how beautiful it was crafted it wanted to be uncovered. 
We saved all the interior shiplap pine to re-clad the walls.  I love the rustic pine in contrast to the slick sheetrock.

The Fireplace is such a great feature inside this house. 

Four sided skylight around the FP!

Original 1930’s floors reinstalled and looking amazing 80 years later.
I couldn’t help but take the cheezy builder in front shot.

Original shipping bill for the lumber off the railway from 1930.

Modern addition on the backside. 

I love this house, it’s so beautiful. 

Can you see the modern dormers with three sided glass?

The original Long Leaf Pine siding reinstalled over a rain screen air gap and 1″ rigid foam.   

If you’d like to see more of this interesting 1930’s remodel I’d love to show you around.  It will be on the AIA Homes Tour this Fall.  I’ll be there all weekend so be sure to stop by.
Best,
Matt Risinger

Risinger Homes is a custom builder and whole house remodeling contractor that specializes in Architect driven and fine craftsmanship work. We utilize an in-house carpentry staff and the latest building science research to build dramatically more efficient, healthy and durable homes.
Be sure to check out my video blog on YouTube

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  • Oh what a beautiful house!! You know I always wanted to visit Austin. Perhaps I should just come with a resume in hand. You do hire RNs right? lol.

    • Ryan, You never know buddy! The three big qualities I look for in team members is Passion, Integrity, and Critical Thinking. Appreciate your faithful following of my blog and comments. Best, Matt

    • Matt,
      What was the purpose, and/or benefit, to the floors being laid first ( when the house was originally built) and then the walls being built atop them?

    • Ryan, I think they laid those hardwood floors first for easy sequencing. Likely less cutting to lay them on the entire first floor deck and I’m guessing they were less concerned about some extra white oak waste being under the walls. Interesting, eh? Best, Matt

    • Very interesting indeed. Nowadays you’d be docked at least a couple of LEED points for wasting material 😉